The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing -- Edmund Burke

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An Essay on
 "The Soul of Freedom"

Body and Soul an American
October, 1999

Dieter H. Dahmen

ddahmen@americasvoices.org  
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Part V

Recapturing our heritage, therefore, must involve the full awareness of the interdependence of our sovereignty and the Second Amendment.  It must in some way form the focal point of all our talks, all our complaints, all our presentations, and all our arguments.  And then it must above all never exclude Him, Who gave this nation breath.  We need to remember our flag.  Thirteen stripes, six white and seven red. Seven, the number of perfection, white, the color of justice, and red, the color of blood, thanks to manís depravity the only legal tender ever by which freedoms are purchased and secured.  Then the encornered Jack, the canton.  Blue, the color of heaven, Godís abode, to Whom the founding fathers appealed for vindication of their cause.  And the stars, related to heaven, therefore, the sons of God, the relationship by reason of which He, Christ the Redeemer, granted victory to their arms.  Let me make this clear.  Without Christ every effort WILL fail and we cannot succeed.  Therefore, to those of you that claim such a relationship, let me make this special appeal.  Reexamine that relationship, make sure it has you in a position where He can hear you, for if there are enough that can be heard, He will sanctify our appeal.  Remember, once, for the sake of only three, He did not destroy the fledgling nation of Israel.  And now we know why destruction overtakes a nation.  Since time immemorial, the destruction of any nation always was Divine discipline, the natural result when those living in them and called by His name choose to ignore Him.  Those who do not have this relationship I challenge to reexamine His claims.  All He wants to do is give you a gift.  It costs you nothing, a free gift, acquired in less than a second, delivered to you and non-returnable.  Perhaps you might become one of those invisible heroes on whose behalf He, the Author of Liberty, will deliver this nation just one more time.

I began this digression on the beauties of freedom and horrors of unconstrained government by alluding to a most stirring moment in this countryís history and I would like to conclude with one.  During the Union retreat from besieging Richmond in 1862, Union General McClellanís army of the Potomac was forced to fight a seven-day, often very bloody, rear guard action.  One of these resulted in a decided Confederate defeat that should have been exploited and could have ended that war then.  But the overcautious McClellan was determined to retreat.  Then, at the last day, the bloody battle of Malvern Hill.  Another stalemate.  Some seven miles away, at Harrisonís Landing, part of the Union line, darkness finally stilled the sound of battle.  A Union captain, in one of the forward lines, became distraught over the many moans and cries for help of stricken soldiers, so much so that he decided, under cover of darkness, at the risk of his own life, crawling on his belly, to rescue the one nearest to him.  Not knowing whether the fallen soldier was federate or confederate, he pulled him back toward his revetment where, in the faint light coming from his position, he realized that he was attempting to save a confederate soldier who just then breathed his last.  Undaunted, he pulled the now lifeless body across his line to safety and there, in the dim light of a lantern held by one of his soldiers, he received the shock of his life.  He was looking into the face of his now dead son! (He had gone to the South to study music before the war began and, when it descended upon the nation, had embraced the confederate cause without telling his father.)  The next morning, the grief stricken father sought permission for a full military honor funeral even though his son wore the uniform of the enemy.  His request was denied.  But because he had distinguished himself valorously many times during this retreat, he was granted a one-man band of his own choosing.  He chose a trumpeter and asked him to play the notes scribbled on a piece of paper he had found in one of the pockets of his sonís uniform.  This is the story of taps.  That mournful, stirring display when soldiers say goodbye to their fallen comrades.  Let us then remember Him Who gave this nation life and blessed her beyond description, lest He should find in one of the pockets of this nationís uniform notes scribbled on a piece of paper and sound taps in farewell to once the greatest country on earth.

 

Published by permission of Dieter H. Dahmen, July 2001, with thanks by Americaís Voices.

 

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